Seminars & Events

Friday, October 4, 2013: Dr. Laurie Ryan, SMCM '86 (National Institute on Aging) will speak on "Alzheimer's Disease: Targets and Treatments" at 3:00 pm in Goodpaster Hall 195.

Monday, October 21, 2013: Dr. Greg Elmer (University of Maryland Baltimore) will speak on "Domains and Constructs in Motivation: Where Does the Habenula Fit In?" at 4:45 pm in Goodpaster Hall 195

Friday, October 25, 2013:  Dr. Terry Davidson (American University) will speak on "Why We Overeat and Become Obese?  It Could be What We Think!" at 3:00 pm in Goodpaster Hall 195.

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Alumni Highlight

Dr. Gwen Calhoon '06 recently received her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of Maryland Baltimore, and was inducted into Nu Rho Psi.

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SMP Spotlight

Katie Gluskin and Jeff Haus present their SMP
Katie Gluskin and Jeff Haus, "Entorhinal Cortex Lesions, Habituation, and Latent Inhibition," 2013. Gluskin and Haus, the 2013 co-winners of the Neuroscience Award, infused a neurotoxin into the entorhinal cortex of rats to induce a lesion, and measured the resulting habituation and latent inhibition behavior within a fear conditioning paradigm.

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Rowlands, Abby (2010).   Effects of Isolation Rearing on the Motivational Properties of Cocaine in the Conditioned Place Preference Test.   Mentor: Dr. Anne Marie Brady

Abstract 

The current study is based on the dual diagnosis model of schizophrenia and addiction.  The high prevalence of the comorbidity of schizophrenia and addiction has drawn the attention of much recent research.  The mesolimbic dopamine pathway, a neural pathway implicated in addiction, has been shown to be dysfunctional in individuals with schizophrenia both drug abusing and non-abusing.  The primary goal of the current research was to investigate the effects of isolation rearing on prepulse inhibition and the motivational properties of cocaine.  Isolation rearing was used as a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia while conditioned place preference (CPP) was used to investigate reward-seeking behaviors.  Subjects included 20 male Sprague Dawley rats which were divided into two housing conditions, social (n =10) and isolate (n=10), for six weeks.  Rats were then tested on prepulse inhibition (PPI) and cocaine CPP.  Results did not support the hypotheses that rats reared in isolation would show deficits in PPI relative to animals housed in social conditions.  While it was also expected that isolation reared animals would show a stronger preference for the drug as shown by greater time spent in the drug-paired room, results showed no interaction between time spent in room and housing condition.  Future research should look to further investigate the pairing of isolation rearing and CPP, as well as the use of cocaine in the CPP model.